Sunday, December 19, 2010

Pinoy Food and Cooking Dictionary - MNO


EDGIE POLISTICO’S encyclopedic PINOY dictionary
filipino food & cooking
Compiled and re-written by Edgie B. Polistico
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED!
last update: Saturday, December 18, 2010 2:38:16 AM
m
maalat (ma-á-lat Tagalog taste) [adj.] salty (parat in Cebuano; pag-ad in Waray)
maamis (ma-a-mís; Bicolano taste) [adj.] sweet \luscious (matamis in Tagalog; tam-is or matam-is in Cebuano; matam-is in Waray and Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); nasamit in Ilocano; mayumu in Pampangueño & Pangasinense; mamis in Maranao & Maguindanaoan; memis in Ibanag & Yakan)
maanggo (ma-ang-gó; Tagalog smell) [adj.] smelling like a fermented milk
maanghang (ma-ang-hang Tagalog taste) [adj.] peppery hot \spicy hot \hot (mahalang or halang in Cebuano; maharang or harang in Waray)
maanta (ma-an-ta; Tagalog smell and taste) [adj.] having the bad smell or taste of stale fats or oils \rancid (a.k.a. amoy panis na lana or lasang panis na lana in Tagalog; bahong pan-os nga lana in Cebuano)
maapla (ma-ap-lá; Cebuano taste) [adj.] (same as aplod)
maaplod (ma-ap-lòd; Visayan taste) [adj.] (same as aplod)
maaskad (ma-as-kàd; Tagalog taste) [adj.] acrid (see mapakla) (a.k.a. askad or mapakla in Tagalog; maaplod, aplod, maapla or apla in Cebuano)
maasim (ma-á-sim; Tagalog taste) [adj.] sour \sour-tasting (a.k.a asim in Tagalog; maaslom or aslom in Cebuano and Waray)
maaslom (ma-ás-lom; Visayan taste) [adj.] sour \sour-tasting (maasim in Tagalog)
mabitang (ma-bi-tang; Panay island’s lizard) [n.] a fruit-eating lizard that can be found only in Panay island. Its meat is considered exotic by the locals.
makunat (ma-kú-nat; Tagalog) [adj.] chewy (hunit in Cebuano)
madaparap (ma-da-pa-ràp; Waray) [adj.] not clear to one’s sight \unclear \hazy \turbid (Malabo in Tagalog, hanap in Cebuano)
macaroons (ma-ka-róns) [n.] coconut cup cake. A small, ball-shaped molded coconut buns. This pastry is made from dessicated grated coconut meat (or bagasse of coconut) blended with condensed milk, butter, beaten egg, and sugar. Sometimes it is flavored with scraped rind of dayap (native lemon) citrus fruit or that of green calamansi (Philippine round lime) as substitute. The molded buns are baked till dried.
macapuno [n.] sport coconut. It is actually the meat of coconut fruit with abnormal growth of nut. A lump of glutinous coconut meat could sometimes fill the entire space in coconut shell. The nut is sliced into pieces (often in cubes) and sweetened by simmering and steeping it in a syrup of melted sugar. The processed macapuno is used as an added ingredient in fruit salad, desserts, and confections. (also spelled as makapuno)
machacao (ma-tsa-kaw; Ilonggo delicacy) [n.] crisp toasted old bread (also spelled as matsakaw)
machang (ma-tsang; Chinese origin) [n.] a suman (glutinuous rice stick) with sliced mushrooms and kastanyas (chestnuts), wrapped in banana leaves in conic shape. Several of these banana-wrapped machang are tied together with string or rope and cooked in boiling water.
magayot (ma-ga-yót; Tagalog) [adj.] tough and leathery to the bite
magig (ma-gìg; Maranao) [n.] water (a.k.a. ig in Maranao and Maguindanaoan; tubig in Tagalog, Cebuano, Hiligaynon (Ilonggo), Bicolano & Waray; danum in Ilocano, Pangasinense, Pampangueño (Capampangan))
maglilitson [n.] a lechonero
mahagkot (ma-hág-kot; Waray) [adj.] (same as mataghom)
mahal (ma-hál Tagalog, Cebuano, Boholano & Waray) [adj.] expensive \costly (a.k.a. maharalon in Waray)
mahalang (ma-há-lang Cebuano taste) [adj.] peppery hot \spicy hot \hot (a.k.a. halang in Cebuano; maanghang in Tagalog; maharang or harang in Waray)
maharang (ma-há-rang Waray taste) [adj.] peppery hot \spicy hot \hot (a.k.a. harang in Waray; mahalang or halang in Cebuano; maanghang in Tagalog; maharang or harang in Waray)

mahareal (ma-ha-re-yál; Tagalog candy) [n.] (same as majareal) (also spelled as majareal)
mahi-mahi (Visayan fish) [n.] el dorado fish, a kind of fish
mahulos (ma-hu-lós; Waray) [adj.] not dry \wet (a.k.a. hulos in Waray; basa in Tagalog, Cebuano, Boholano & Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); dumog in Bicolano; nabasa in Ilocano; iwasan in Maguindanao)
mahumok (ma-hú-mok; Waray) [adj.] lacking firmness \not hard \soft \tender (malambot in Tagalog; humok in Cebuano)
mainit (ma-í-nit; Tagalog, Cebuano, Hiligaynon (Ilonggo), Bicolano) [adj.] hot \warm (a.k.a. init in Tagalog, Cebuano; paso or mapaso in Waray; napudot in Ilocano; mapali in Pampangueño (Capampangan); ampetang in Pangasinense; mayao in Maranao; mayaw in Maguindanaoan; mala in Subanon)
mais (ma-ís; Tagalog; Cebuano; Waray) [n.] corn
*atsarang mais [n.] corn relish
*bigas na mais; bugas mais - [n.] (see under bigas)
*ginataang mais (Tagalog dish) [n.] young corn in coconut milk
*sopas mais - [n.] corn soup
mais con hielo (ma-ís kon yé-lo; Tagalog and Capampangan refreshment) [n.] sweetcorn topped with shaved ice. A refreshment made from boiled kernels of sweetcorn added with some evaporated milk, sweetened with sugar, and topped with plenty of shaved ice. It is eaten using a spoon and is mixed well by slowly stirring to blend and evenly distribute the ingredients. (also spelled as mais con yelo)
mais con yelo (ma-ís kon yé-lo; Tagalog and Capampangan refreshment) [n.] (same as mais con hielo)
maja blanca (má-ha bláng-ka) [n.] blancmange of corn starch and coconut cream. A gelatinous coconut milk cake prepared with or without grated yellow corn. When prepared, some sugar is added in the mixture as sweetener, using enough amount to make it sweetish. If coconut cream is not available, it can be substituted with evaporated milk. Maja blanca is served cool and is usually topped with latik (the browned residue produced in making coconut oil).
*maja kalabasa (má-ha ka-la-bá-sà) [n.] a blancmange that uses mashed squash as one of the main ingredients. Basically, corn starch and coconut cream are still used in making this blancmange as its binder and flavor enhancer.
majareal (ma-ha-re-yál; Tagalog candy) [n.] coconut and ground peanut candy (also spelled as mahareal)
makaong (ma-ká-ong; Waray ware) [n.] big and deep bowl, often used for serving soupy dish or gruel (panaksan in Cebuano & Boholano; mangkok in Tagalog).
makapuno (ma-ka-pu-nò) [n.] (same as macapuno)
makarub-karub (ma-ka-rùb ka-rùb; Waray) [adj.] crisp \crunchy (a.k.a. maragumo in Waray; malutong in Tagalog and Pampangueño; kagumkom in Cebuano; tagumkom in Boholano; nasarangsang in Ilocano; mahagpok in Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); maragsik in Bicolano; masalangsang in Pangasinense; kega in Maranao; matitik in Maguindanaoan)
mala (ma-la; Subanon)) [adj.] hot \warm (mainit or init in Tagalog, Cebuano; paso or mapaso in Waray; napudot in Ilcano; mapali in Pampangueno (Capampangan); ampetang in Pangasinense; mayao in Maranao; mayaw in Maguindanao)
malabnaw (ma-lab-náw; Tagalog) [adj.] thin and watery \washy \diluted. (lapsaw in Cebuano and Waray)
malabo (ma-lá-bô; Tagalog) [adj.] not clear to one’s sight \unclear \hazy \turbid (hanap in Cebuano, daparap in Waray)
malabsa (ma-láb-sâ; Tagalog) [adj.] (same as malabsak)
malabsak (ma-láb-sàk; Tagalog) [adj.] soft and sticky due to overcooking, as in overcooked noodles, rice, puto (rice cake), or vegetables, particularly when they appear flabby and soggy. (a.k.a. malabsa in Tagalog; basa-basa nga lata in Cebuano)
Malacañang roll (ma-la-kan-yang ról) [n.] a jelly roll with chocolate custard filling, and garnished with white frosting.
malagatas (ma-la-gá-tas; Tagalog) 1. [adj.] milky white, referring to the color and transparency of texture, as in some variety of rice grains, keso (cheese), noodles, and fruit juices; 2. [adj.] tastes like milk \milky (gatason in Cebuano & Boholano)
malagkit (ma-lag-kit; Tagalog) [adj.] sticky \glutinous (pilit in Cebuano)
malagkit (ma-lag-kit; Tagalog grain) [n.] glutinous rice \sticky rice (see also bigas) (pilit or bugas pilit in Visayan)
malambot (ma-lám-bot; Tagalog) [adj.] lacking firmness \not hard \soft \tender (humok in Cebuano; mahumok in Waray)
malamig (ma-la-mig; Tagalog) [n.] cold \not hot (bugnaw in Cebuano; mataghom or mahagkot in Waray)
*helado (Tagalog) [adj.] frozen
malamig na kanin (ma-la-mìg na ká-nin; Tagalog staple) [n.] (same as kaning lamig)
malangsa (ma-láng-sa; Cebuano and Waray) [adj.] having a fishy smell \having fishy taste. (malansa in Tagalog)
malansa (ma-lán-sa; Tagalog) [adj.] having a fishy smell \having fishy taste. (malangsa in Cebuano and Waray)
malapot (ma-lá-pot; Tagalog) [adj.] thick or dense, referring to liquids, and often it is viscuous in consistency (a.k.a. in Tagalog; espeso in Cebuano and Waray)
malasa (ma-lá-sa; Tagalog taste) [adj.] tasty \palatable (a.k.a. may lasa in Tagalog; lami-lami, lamian or lamion in Cebuano & Boholano; maurorasa or marurasa in Waray)
malasado (ma-la-sá-do; Tagalog, Cebuano, Boholano & Waray) [adj.] half-cooked \rare, said that of grilled or roasted meat or fish (a.k.a. hilaw-hilaw in Cebuano)
malasado (ma-la-sá-do; Tagalog dish) [n.] rare \half-cooked \animal meat and skin kinilaw made by roasting them slightly or quickly passing them through the fire or over hot embers, thus the outside of the meat and skin is heated, sealing the liquid and softness inside, making every bite a succulent experience. The prepared malasado is served in vinegar with spices and some salt to taste or the siding of dipping sauce made of vinegar, ginger, and onions. (harog in Surigao; imbaliktad in Iloko)
malasebo (ma-la-sé-bo; Tagalog) [n.] half-ripe sweet-sour tamarind fruit
malasugue (ma-la-sú-gi) [n.] swordfish \black or white marlin \Swordfish is a kind of sea fish, and is one of the kinds of fish that has very high level of mercury content. Dietitians and health experts advised to avoid as much as possible the consumption of this fish to avoid mercury poisoning and its dreaded long-term effect in the nervous system (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
*malasugue sa batong gata (Zamboanga dish) [n.] swordfish in coconut sauce
malasugi (ma-la-sú-gi) [n.] (same as malasugue)
malata (ma-la-tà; Tagalog) [adj.] soft and mushy due to overcooki, such as an overcooked rice, pasta, potatoes, puto (rice cake), etc. (lata in Cebuano)
malatindok (ma-la-tín-dok; Visayan fish) [n.] mackerel scad \carangoid fish \a sea fish that has a long, round and fleshy body (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
malauhog (ma-la-ú-hog; Tagalog) [n.] very soft meat of young coconut while in its early stage of development. It looks quite transparent, thin, and would easily break when scraped or scooped. The word malauhog is from the Tagalog word uhog, which means “mucus”. Hence, malauhog is one that “looks like a mucus” because this very thin meat of coconut looks like a clear mucus that comes out from the nose of someone who has cold. (sip-on for in Cebuano)
malauhog (ma-la-ú-hog; Tagalog fish) [n.] an endemic fish from Balayan Bay that breeds in Taal Lake (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
malig-ang (ma-líg-ang; Camarines Norte fruit) [n.] (same as lipote)
maligat (ma-lí-gat; Tagalog) [adj.] would take a hard, long time of chewing to thoroughly masticate what is being chewed \needs much chewing \chewy (usaponon og maayo in Cebuano)
malinamnam (ma-li-nam-nam; Tagalog taste) [adj.] tasty \delectable (a.k.aa masarap in Tagalog; lamian in Cebuano)
maliputo (ma-li-pu-tó; Tagalog fish) [n.] freshwater jack, an endemic fish from Balayan Bay that breeds in the waters and tributaries of Taal Lake (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
maloto (ma-ló-tò; Bicolano staple) [n.] boiled rice \cooked rice (kanin or lutong kanin in Tagalog; kan-on, luto, or nilun-ag bugas in Cebuano; dinun-ag in Boholano; kan-on in Waray)
malunggay (ma-lúng-gay; Tagalog vegetable) [n.] horse radish tree \moringa (see also gulay for other Tagalog vegetables) (kalamunggay in Cebuano; kamunggay in Boholano)
*malunggay juice (Pangasinense newly concocted refreshment) [n.] moringa juice, a concoction of boiled malunggay leaves, honey and calamansi juice (extracted juice of Philippine round lime).
malutong (ma-lu-tóng; Tagalog and Pampangueño) [adj.] crisp \crunchy (kagumkom in Cebuano; tagumkom in Boholano; makarubkarub or maragumo in Waray; nasarangsang in Ilocano; mahagpok in Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); maragsik in Bicolano; masalangsang in Pangasinense; kega in Maranao; matitik in Maguindanaoan)
mameng (má-meng) [n.] Napoleon wrasse \humphead Napoleon wrasse, a kind of fish (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
mami (ma-mi) [n.] (see under pancit)
mamis (ma-mís; Maranao & Maguindanaoan taste) [adj.] sweet \luscious (matamis in Tagalog; tam-is or matam-is in Cebuano; matam-is in Waray and Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); nasamit in Ilocano; mayumu in Pampangueño & Pangasinense; maamis in Bicolano; memis in Ibanag & Yakan)
mamsa (mám-sà; Visayan fish) [n.] jack fish, a kind of sea fish (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
mamon (ma-món) [n.] chiffon cake. A rich spongy soft cake, usually round in shape or as a cupcake.
*mammon tostado [n.] toasted mamon (cupcake), either whole or sliced. Special version has butter spread on the cake and sprinkle of refined white sugar, and sometimes grated cheese, then toasted in the oven till crisp.
managat (ma-na-gàt; Visayan and Mindanawanon fish) [n.] perch fish
managat (ma-na-gàt; Tagalog fish) [n.] snapper (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
managat (ma-na-gàt; Ilonggo fish) [n.] mangrove jack (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
manamistamis (ma-na-mìs-ta-mís; Tagalog taste) [adj.] rather sweet \somewhat sweet \sweetish \slightly sweet (tam-is tam-is or tam-ison in Cebuano)
manamit (ma-si-rám; Bicolano taste) [adj.] delicious \taste good \delectable (a.k.a. masiram in Bicolano; lami in Cebuano and Boholano, marasa or karasa in Waray; namit in Ilonggo; masarap in Tagalog)
mandunggada (man-dung-gá-da; Cebuano dish) (see under dinugoan)
mandunggo (man-dúng-go; Cebuano meat part) beef tripe \the tripe of cow (see also goto) (goto in Tagalog)
mangagat (ma-nga-gàt; Tagalog fish) [n.] (same as apahap; see also isda for the list of other fishes)
mangko (máng-kô; Visayan fish) [n.] (see under tuna)
mangga (máng-ga) [n.] mango (sc.name: Mangifera indica). Its fruit is heart-shaped and varies in sizes depending on the variety, and has one big seed inside. The skin of mango fruit is green when unripe and has a sourish crunchy pulp. Some would like to eat it unripe, such as that some pregnant women who have a pica would asked their partner to hunt this fruit somewhere. The skin would turn yellow or yellow orange in color as it ripens and the flesh becomes soft, sweet and fragrant. Mango fruit is the national fruit of the Philippines. The known sweetest mango varieties are grown in Guimaras island and Zambales province.
*mango de carabao (máng-go de ka-ra-báw) [n.] a variety of large-sized, roundish, and fleshy. This is the kind of mango grown in Zambales povince. Zambaleños called this big-sized mango as dinamulag. Dinamulag is a Zambali word meaning “carabao-like,” referring to the large size of dominant mango variety grown in the province, specifically in Masinloc town. Dinamulag is considered among the tastiest variety of mango in the world. (a.k.a. dinamulag in Zambales)
*dinamulag (di-na-mú-lag; Zambaleños fruit; dw Zambali damulag) [n.] (same as mango de carabao) (a.k.a. mango de carabao)
*pico (pi-ko; dw Span. puco) [n.] a variety of small-sized mango and has thick skin. This is the kind of mango that is commonly used in making burong mangga (brined green mango). The skin would turn yellow to yellow-orange in color and dents or slightly wrinkles as it ripens. (also spelled as piko)
*piko (pi-ko; dw Span.puco) [n.] (same as pico)
*paho (pá-ho) [n.] Indian mango. A variety of small-sized, round, and plump mango with a darkgreen skin and fibrous flesh. This is often used as an alternative to pico in making burong mangga (brined green maggo). Like pico, its skin would wrinkle as it ripens.
*Indian mango (in-dyán mang-go) [n.] (same as paho)
*manggang hilaw (máng-gang hi-láw; Visayan fruit) [n.] green mango \unripe mango
*mangga rachada (máng-ga rat-sá-da; Visayan preserved fruit) [n.] peeled unripe mango pickled in brine or the water and salt solution. Often served as siding dish mixed or topped with sautéed uyap (shrimp paste) (burong mangga in Tagalog)
*mangga rachada (máng-ga rat-sá-da; Visayan preserved fruit) [n.] (same as the Tagalog burong mangga; see burong mangga)
*burong mangga (bú-rong máng-ga; Tagalog preserved fruit; dw Tag. buro + mangga) [n.] (see under buro)
*dried mango (dráyd máng-go; Cebuano preserved fruit) [n.] dried flesh of ripe mango. The flesh of ripe mango is sliced, cooked in sugar syrup, then dried. Tourists would fondly buy dried mango as pasalubong (bring home goodies).
*mangga at sago (máng-ga at sa-gó; Visayan refreshment) [n.] mango and sago pearls, a cold refreshment of ripe mango pulp and softened sago pearl in sweetened creamy milk and bits of gulaman (gelatin).
*green mango juice (grén mang-go dyús) [n.] juice drink made of unripe mango puréed in blender, added with milk and crushed or cubed ice, and sweetened with sugar.
*green mango shake (grén mang-go shék) [n.] unripe mango purée in finely crushed ice, sweetened with sugar, syrup, or honey, and with milk. It is mixed well in a blender.
mangkok (mang-kok; Tagalog ware; dw Chin. mangkok) [n.] big and deep bowl, often used for serving soupy dish or gruel (panaksan in Cebuano & Boholano; makaong in Waray).
manggostan (mang-gos-tan; Visayan & Tagalog fruit) [n.] mangosteen (sc.name: Garcinia mangostana) (a.k.a. manggosten; see also prutas for list of other fruits)
*mangosteen candy (Davaoeño sweet) [n.] a candy made from the pulp and the purplish soft inner part of the rind of a ripe mangosteen fruit, mashed well and added with fresh milk (in case of powder it is added with water), glucose and sugar. The mixed ingredients are boiled in the pan until it becomes very thick and gooey. The cooked candy is then laid flattened on the table about ¼ inch thick, then sliced into bite-size bar and allowed to cool off. When cool, the candy hardens. It is then stored and wrapped in plastic cellophane or each bar is wrapped with cut pieces of papel de hapon (Japanese paper) or plastic sheets.
manggosten (mang-gos-ten) [n.] mangosteen (see manggostan). (a.k.a. manggostan)
mangorind (mang-go-rínd; Visayan fruit candy) [n.] A chewy candy made from the pulp of ripe mango and tamarind. The name itself is the combination of these two fruits, “mango” and “tamarind” (it’s the mangga and sambag in Cebuano). The pulp of these ripe fruits is scraped, blended together, added with sugar and cooked into a gooey candy.
mango de carabao (mang-go de ka-ra-báw) [n.] (See under mangga)
mani (ma-ní) [n.] peanut, a kind legiumes.
*peanut kisses [n.] (see under cookies)
*star peanuts [n.] (see under cookies)
manibalang (ma-ni-bá-lang; Tagalog) [adj.] the stage when the fruit is half green (unripe) and half ripe, wherein the flesh is quite soft but still crunchy like that of a papayang manibalang (see under papaya) \not so ripe \almost ripe (kalbangaan in Cebuano & Boholano; kalabao in Waray)
manla (man-lâ; Visayan crustacean) [n.] lobster \prawn \crawfish, a kind of crustacean
manok (ma-nók) [n.] chicken. It refers to both the live chicken and the chicken meat (poultry).
*manok at trepang (ma-nòk at tré-pang; Mindanaoan dish) [n.] chicken and sea cucumber. The chicken meat is stewed with processed sea cucumber, seasoned spices and dash of salt to taste.
*manok Bisaya (ma-nòk bi-sa-yâ; Visayan fowl) [n.] native chicken, specifically the ones grown in Visayas
*manok Tagalog (ma-nòk ta-gá-log; Tagalog fowl) [n.] native chicken, the ones grown in Luzon, specifically in Tagalog region
*ipitan (i-pí-tan; Batangueño chicken) [n.] chicken raised in a narrow or small cage where the fowl almost could not move except that of moving its head when eating its feed mostly that of corn seeds or corn meal. Due to having little movement, the chicken produces a tender yellowish meat and is cooked into a delicious broth for special occasion
*sisiw (sí-siw; Tagalog fowl) [n.] chick
*piso (pi-sô, pí-sô; Visayan fowl) [n.] chick
*dumalaga (du-ma-lá-ga; Tagalog fowl) [n.] an adolescent or young female chicken nearing to become a hen
*dumalagahay (du-ma-la-gá-hay; Visayan fowl) [n.] (same as the Tagalog dumalaga)
*darag (da-rág; Aklan fowl) [n.] native chicken \a strain of native chicken in western Visayas that is known to have a unique quality of meat and distinctive taste. A far better quality of poultry product can be produced if the grower would feed darag chicken with Marande leaves (sc.name: Tricanthera gigantean), meat from golden kuhol (snail), and duckweed.
*karneng manok (kar-neng ma-nòk; Tagalog meat) [n.] (see under karne)
*free range chicken = (n.) chicken that is allowed to feed or graze for food, as in a field, rather than being enclosed
mantecado sherbet (man-te-ká-do shér-bet) [n.] a sherbert (or fruit juice) with rind of dayap (native lime) and vanilla flavoring.
*mantecado ice cream (man-te-ká-do áys-krem) [n.] (see under sorbetes)
mantika (man-tí-kâ; dw Span. manteca) [n.] cooking oil \vegetable oil \edible oil. The word mantika is from the Spanish manteca which is the lard or animal fat that is used in cooking. The Philippine adaption of the word manteca to mean mantika includes all kinds of cooking oils, particularly those obtained from plants such as coconut oil, palm oil, corn oil, olive oil, pili oil, and others, as well as oil from the animal fats, such as from pork, chicken skin, and some kinds of fatty fish.
mantikain (man-ti-ká-in; Tagalog) [adj.] oily, referring to oily food. (mantikaon in Cebuano)
mantikaon (man-ti-ka-ón; Cebuano) [adj.] oily, referring to oily food. (mantikain in Tagalog)
mantikilya (man-ti-kíl-ya; dw Span. mantequilla) [n.] margarine \butter (a.k.a. margarina)
mapag-ad (ma-pág-ad; Waray taste) [adj.] salty (a.k.a. pag-ag in Waray; parat in Cebuano; maalat in Tagalog)
mapakla (ma-pak-là; Tagalog taste) [adj.] acrid. Tastes bitter and harsh to taste as unripe banana and the sap of uncooked vegetables (maapla or maaplod in Cebuano)
mapait (ma-pa-ìt; Tagalog, Cebuano, Boholano & Waray taste) [adj.] bitter (a.k.a. pait)
mapali (ma-pa-lì; Pampangueño (Capampangan)) [adj.] hot \warm (mainit or init in Tagalog, Cebuano; paso or mapaso in Waray; napudot in Ilcano; ampetang in Pangasinense; mayao in Maranao; mayaw in Maguindanaoan; mala in Subanon)
mapaso(ma-pa-sò; Waray) [adj.] hot \warm (a.k.a. paso in Waray; init or mainit in Tagalog and Cebuano; napudot in Ilocano; mapali in Pampangueño (Capampangan); ampetang in Pangasinense; mayao in Maranao; mayaw in Maguindanaoan; mala in Subanon)
maragumo (ma-ra-gu-mô; Waray) [adj.] crisp \crunchy (a.k.a. makarub-karub in Waray; malutong in Tagalog and Pampangueño; kagumkom in Cebuano; tagumkom in Boholano; nasarangsang in Ilocano; mahagpok in Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); maragsik in Bicolano; masalangsang in Pangasinense; kega in Maranao; matitik in Maguindanaoan)
marasa (ma-rá-sa; Waray taste) [adj.] delicious \taste good \delectable (a.k.a. karasa in Waray; lami in Cebuano and Boholano, masarap in Tagalog; namit in Ilonggo; masiram or manamit in Bicolano)
marigoso (ma-ri-gó-so; Waray vegetable) [n.] bitter gourd (see ampaliya)
marinaut (ma-ri-na-út; Maranao citrus fruit) [n.] a native lemon, its juice is used as souring agent in making fish kinilaw (ceviche).
margarina (mar-ga-rí-na) [n.] margarine (a.k.a. mantikilya)
martiniko (mar-ti-ní-ko; Tagalog fish) [n.] a spiny, hardy but tasty fish (see also isda for the list of other fishes) (a.k.a. liwalo)
marungoy (ma-rú-ngoy; Visayan fish) [n.] flying fish \sailfish, a kind of sea fish that is actually gliding or skimming on the surface of the sea (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
marurasa (ma-ru-ra-sá; Waray taste) [adj.] tasty \palatable (a.k.a. maurorasa in Waray lami-lami, lamian or lamion in Cebuano & Bioholano; malasa in Tagalog)
maruya (ma-rú-yà; Tagalog & Cebuano) [n.] fritter. It is anything shredded, or cut in strips, or the like, then mixed in batter and then fried till it hardens and holds its form. The batter is made of sifted flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt, which are then mixed together in a mixing bowl with some water. Additional ingredient of egg is combined with some liquid milk (if powder milk is used, enough water is added) and then mixed thoroughly into the flour mix to form a smooth batter. In mixing several eggs into the batter, the egg is beaten one by one into the flour mix. Butter or margarine maybe added to enhance flavor. Roasted sesame seeds is sometimes sprinkled on the cooked fritter to add a nutty flavor on the maruya.
*maruyang hipon (ma-rú-yàng hi-pon; Tagalog) [n.] shrimp fritter dish. This is made of tiny or small shrimps (washed whole and still complete with their heads and shells) blended in batter. A scoop of the mixture is then fried in a round, flat shape into a pan with hot cooking oil. Frying is done when the fritter and batter holds its form, or the shrimps turned reddish-brown.
*maruyang kamote (ma-rú-yang ka-mó-te) [n.] sweet potato fritters. This is made of sweet potatoes that is peeled off of its skin and its meat grated using a grater with big holes. The grated sweet potatoes is blended with the batter and a scoop of it is fried until golden brown. This delicacy is served with dust of sugar to add more sweetness, if desired.
*maruyang saging (ma-rú-yang sa-ging) [n.] banana fritters. Using ripe banana fruit (saba or cardava), thinly sliced and spread to form like a handheld fan, then coated with batter and fried in hot cooking oil. Maruyang saging is traditional shaped like a fan, but the fruit can also be chopped into small cubes or mashed and shaped into a mound or small flat circles coated with batter and fried. When cooked, it is then rolled or sprinkled with white sugar.
masalangsang (ma-sa-lang-sáng; Pangasinense) [adj.] crisp \crunchy (a.k.a. malutong in Tagalog and Pampangueño; kagumkom in Cebuano; tagumkom in Boholano; mahagpok in Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); makarub-karub or maragumo in Waray; maragsik in Bicolano; nasarangsang in Ilocano; kega in Maranao; matitik in Maguindanaoan)
masapan de mani (ma-sa-pàn de ma-ní; Quezon sweet) [n.] (see mazapan de mani)
masapan de pili (ma-sa-pàn de pí-li; Bicolano sweet) [n.] (see mazapan de pili)
masaprodida (ma-sa-pro-dí-da) [n.] (see under cookies)
masarap (ma-sa-ráp; Tagalog taste) [adj.] delicious \taste good \delectable (a.k.a. malinamnam in Tagalog; lami in Cebuano and Boholano, marasa in Waray; namit in Ilonggo; masiram or manamit in Bicolano)
matabang (ma-ta-báng; Tagalog taste) [adj.] no taste \tasteless \bland (tab-ang or walay lami in Cebuano; tab-ang or way lami in Boholano, matab-ang or waray rasa in Waray)
matab-ang (ma-táb-ang; Waray taste) [adj.] no taste \tasteless \bland (a.k.a. waray rasa in Waray; tabang or walang lasa in Tagalog; tab-ang or way lami in Boholano, matab-ang or waray rasa in Waray)
matam-is (ma-tám-is; Cebuano, Waray & Hiligaynon (Ilonggo) taste) [adj.] sweet \luscious (a.k.a. tam-is in Cebuano; matamis in Tagalog; nasamit in Ilocano; maamis in Bicolano; mayumu in Pampangueño & Pangasinense; mamis in Maranao & Maguindanaoan; memis in Ibanag & Yakan)
masareal (ma-sa-re-yál; Cebuano sweet) [n.] a bar of finely ground peanut mixed with ground refined sugar and milk powder.
masiram (ma-si-rám; Bicolano taste) [adj.] delicious \taste good \tasty \delectable (a.k.a. manamit in Bicolano; lami in Cebuano and Boholano, marasa or karasa in Waray; namit in Ilonggo; masarap in Tagalog)
mata (ma-tá; Tagalog, Cebuano, Boholano & Waray) [n.] eye
mataghom (ma-tág-hon; Waray term) [n.] cold, as in cold water \not hot, as in soup that had been served a long while ago (a.k.a. mahagkot in Waray; bugnaw in Cebuano; malamig in Tagalog)
matambaka (ma-tàm-bá-ka; Tagalog fish) [n.] (same as matang baka)
matamis(ma-ta-mís; Tagalog taste) [n.] sweet \lusciuos (tam-is in Cebuano; matam-is in Waray and Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); nasamit in Ilocano; maamis in Bicolano; mayumu in Pampangueño & Pangasinense; mamis in Maranao & Maguindanaoan; memis in Ibanag & Yakan)
matamis na bao (ma-ta-mís na bá-o; Tagalog sweet) [n.] sweet coconut jam stuffed in coconut shell. It is made of panocha (molded raw sugar or brown sugarcane) cooked in coconut milk until they combine and become very thick or gooey in consistency like jam. It is then stored in a emptied and cleaned coconut shell and eaten as is or used as spread on biscuits, bread, and other kakanin (native sweet delicacies). The name matamis na bao is actually a misnomer for bao (coconut shell) could not be eaten to taste or be made into sweet. The delicacy should have been called matamis sa bao (see also panocha)
matamis na pugad ng balinsasayaw (ma-ta-mís na pú-gad nang ba-lin-sa-sa-yáw; Palawan dish) [n.] (see under bird’s nest soup)
matang baka (ma-tàng bá-ka; Tagalog fish) [n.] purse-eyed scad (see also isda for the list of other fishes) (a.k.a. matambaka in Tagalog; gutob in Iligan; tolay in Muslim)
matang pesa (ma-tàng pé-sa; Tagalog fish) [n.] (same as apahap)
matitik (ke-gà; Maguindanaoan) [adj.] crisp \crunchy (a.k.a. malutong in Tagalog and Pampangueño; kagumkom in Cebuano; tagumkom in Boholano; mahagpok in Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); makarub-karub or maragumo in Waray; maragsik in Bicolano; nasarangsang in Ilocano; masalangsang in Pangasinense; kega in Maranao)
matsakaw (ma-tsa-kàw; Ilonggo delicacy) [n.] (same as machacao)
maurorasa (ma-u-ro-ra-sá; Waray taste) [adj.] (same as marurasa)
maya-maya (ma-ya má-ya; Tagalog fish) [n.] red snapper, a kind of sea fish. It is supposed to refer only to the red snapper, but in the Philippines, people mistakenly extend this variety by calling “white snapper” as maya-maya when in fact it is an emperor fish (betilya in Tagalog) passed off as a white “red-snapper.” Maya-maya is one of the kinds of fish that has moderate level of mercury content. Dietitians and health experts advised to limit consumption of this fish to two times per week. Each serving weighs 180 grams or six ounces (see also isda for the list of other fishes) (katambak in Cebuano)
mayao (ma-yáw; Maranao)) [adj.] hot \warm (mainit or init in Tagalog, Cebuano; paso or mapaso in Waray; napudot in Ilcano; mapali in Pampangueno (Capampangan); ampetang in Pangasinense; mayaw in Maguindanaoan; mala in Subanon)
mayaw (ma-yáw; Maguindanao)) [adj.] hot \warm (mainit or init in Tagalog, Cebuano; paso or mapaso in Waray; napudot in Ilcano; mapali in Pampangueno (Capampangan); ampetang in Pangasinense; mayao in Maranao; mala in Subanon)
maybay (máy-bay; Visayan fruit) [n.] (see under saging)
mazapan de mani (ma-sa-pàn de ma-ní; Quezon sweet; dw Span. mazapán < Eng. marzipan + Fil. mani) [n.] a marzipan of yema balls embedded with lots of finely ground peanuts (also spelled as masapan de mani)
mazapan de pili (ma-sa-pàn de pí-li; Bicolano sweet; dw Span. mazapán < Eng. marzipan + Fil. pili) [n.] pili nut confection. A marzipan of ground toasted pili nuts, sugar, and egg white made into a paste, cooked then molded in variously shapes such as small balls, egg-shaped, flat circles, or flattened then cut into bite-size bars. Each piece in then wrapped in plastic sheets or cut of papel de Hapon (Japanese paper). Its variants has added ingredients and flavors such as vanilla, rinds of citrus fruits, candied jackfruits, grated young coconut meat, or sesame seeds. (also spelled as masapan de pili)
meatball (mèt bols; dw Eng. meat + ball) [n.] a ball of ground meat, where the meat is manually rolled into a ball with other ingredients, such as starch flour or bread crumbs, minced onions, spices, and beaten egg to cement the mold. Meatballs can be cooked by frying, steaming or braising. It can be served as main course in tomato sauce or as an appetizer, it can also be cooked and served in a soup with light broth and vegetables (a.k.a. albondigas; bola-bolang karne in Tagalog)
media noche (med-ya nó-tse; dw Span. media + noche) [n.] food and drinks served in the evening, before the Christmass eve mass.
mechado (me-tsá-do) [n.] braised beef à la mode. The whole beef round with strips of fats is simmered in tomato sauce with chuncks of onions. Some amount of water in added to prevent the sauce from drying on prolonged cooking. Big slices of potatoes maybe added in the middle of simmering. Cooking is done when beef is already very tender. Dash of salt is added to taste.
membrillo (mem-bríl-yo; dw Span. membrillo) [n.] the quince tree and its fruit.
*dulce de membrillo (dúl-si de mem-bríl-yo; Spanish origin; dw Span. dulce de membrillo) [n.] quince jelly. Considering that quince fruit is not always available in the Philippines, locally available fruits are used as substitute, such as ripe mango, orange, pomelo, etc..
memis (me-mís; Ibanag & Yakan taste) [adj.] sweet \luscious (matamis in Tagalog; tam-is or matam-is in Cebuano; matam-is in Waray and Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); nasamit in Ilocano; mayumu in Pampangueño & Pangasinense; maamis in Bicolano; mamis in Maranao & Maguindanaoan)
menudencia (me-nu-dén-sya; Quezon province dish) [n.] a version of menudo prepared by local cooks in Tayabas, Quezon
menudo (me-nú-do; dw Span. menudo [chopped in small pieces]) [n.] mixture of cubed slices of pork and pig’s liver, potatoes, & bell pepper, cooked in red sauce. The name is from the Spanish word menudo which means “chopped in small pieces,” the derivation of why this dish means a “little stew.” The meat and vegetable ingredients, along with peeled potatoes, are sliced into small cubes and simmered in rich tomato sauce and selected spices, such as ground pepper corn, bell pepper, garlic, etc. Sliced ox tripe, cutlets of chorizo (pork sausage), cubed squash, and chopped garbansos (chick peas) can also added as filler ingredients. If tomato suace is not available, tomato catsup or banana catsup will do for the red sauce.
merenderos (me-ren-dé-ros; dw Span. merendero [outdoor bar]) [n.] snack bar. A restaurant or outdoor bar that sells snacks. (a.k.a. meryendahan in Tagalog)
merengge (me-réng-ge; dw Span. merengue [meringue]) [n.] meringue. A mixture of egg whites and refined white sugar, beaten well until stiff. With the use of pastry bag, the beaten mixture is put inside the bag and then squeezed to form like bar cookies on baking pan and baked in oven till it hardens. It looks like a bar of white cookie with grooves curving lengthwise towards a pinnacle on one end, very light in weight, crisp and tastes like candy.
merienda (mer-ryén-da; Tagalog, Cebuano & Waray; dw Span. merienda [snack]) [n.] (same as meryenda)
merienda cena (mer-ryén-da sé-na; Tagalog; dw Span. merienda [snack] + cena [dinner]) [n.] (see under meryenda)
merindal (mi-ren-dál; Bicolano) [n.] snack (merienda or meryenda in Tagalog, Cebuano Waray; kakan sa maito in Maranao; minidal in Tagalog & Pampangueño (Capampangan); kakan sa paidu in Maguindanaoan)
merkado (pa-léng-ke; Cebuano; Boholano; Hiligaynon (Ilonggo), Bicolano and Waray) [n.] market (see also Tagalog palengke) (a.k.a. tiyangge in Cebuano and Boholano)
meryenda (mer-yén-da; Tagalog, Ilocano, Hiligaynon (Ilonggo), Waray, Pangasinense & Hantikanon snack; dw Span. merienda [snack]) [n.] snack. Before, it only refers to the afternoon snack, anytime between lunch and dinner. Later on, the use of the word merienda includes the mid-morning snack. Eventually, it refers now to all kinds of snacks eaten anytime and anywhere. (also spelled as merienda in Tagalog, Cebuano Waray; a.k.a. minindal in Tagalog & Pampangueño (Capampangan); merindal in Bicolano; kakan sa maito in Maranao; kakan sa paidu in Maguindanaoan)
*merienda cena (mer-ryén-da sé-na; Tagalog; dw Span. merienda [snack] + cena [dinner]) [n.] a gathering or get-together party held in late afternoon where lots of snacks are served and eaten till evening comes. It could be considered either as an early dinner or late afternoon meal.
meryendahan (mer-yen-da-hán; dw Span. merienda [snack]) [n.] snack bar. A restaurant or outdoor bar that sells snacks. (a.k.a. merenderos in Tagalog)
metate (mer-tá-te; Tagalog & Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); dw Span. metate) 1. [n.] in Ilonggo, it is a primitive cornmill, a rounded stone for grinding maize or crushing cacao seeds; 2. [n.] in southern Tagalog region, it is a flat slab of granite stone, or sometime designed to have a surface that that curves inward in the middle, and paired with a handheld big stone rolling pin. It is used in olden times to finely crush roasted cacao seeds to make tablea (cacao chocolate tablet).
miki (mí-ki) [n.] (see under pancit)
mikilog (mi-ki-log) [n.] (see under pancit)
milagrosa (mi-lag-gró-sa) [n.] (see under bigas)
minanok (mi-na-nók; Sariaya, Quezon dish) [n.] carabao meat cooked by boiling long and relished with mustard leaves, salt and spices.
minindal (mi-nín-dal; Tagalog & Pampangueño (Capampangan)) [n.] snack (merienda or meryenda in Tagalog, Cebuano Waray; merindal in Bicolano; kakan sa maito in Maranao; kakan sa paidu in Maguindanaoan)
minatamis (mina-ta-mís; Tagalog sweet; dw Tag. tamis [sweet]) [adj.] sweetened
*minatamis na saging (mi-na-ta-mís na sá-ging; Tagalog sweet) [n.] banana fruit (saba or cardava, preferably ripe), peeled and cooked in caramelized sugar, sometimes with sago (also spelled as minatamis na saguing)
*minatamis na saguin (mi-na-ta-mís na sá-ging; Pampangueño sweet) [n.] (same as minatamis na saging)
Mindoro calamay (min-do-ro ka-lá-may) [n.] (see under calamay)
mishua(mís-wa) [n.] (see under pancit)
miso(mi-sò; Tagalog ingredient) [n.] soybean paste. Made of beans that are steamed and finely mashed into lumps. It is used in soup such as in sinigang; or as a sauce in making pesa; also as meat substitute in some fried dishes for a vegetarian meals.
misuwa(mi-su-wá) [n.] (see mishua under pancit)
miswa(mís-wa) [n.] (see mishua under pancit)
mochi (mot-tsì) [n.] palitaw with grated coconut and coconut cream
moldehan (mol-dé-han) [n.] baking pan \molding pan \mold (US) \mould (Brit.) (hurnohan in Visayan)
molido (mo-lí-do) [n.] ground pili nuts made into candy by adding lots of sugar and some milk (liquid) then boiled until it thickens. It hardens when it cools down. While still pliant, the candy is cut into bite size and wrapped individually in plastic sheet wrapper or a cut of papel de Hapon (Japanese paper).
molinillo (mo-li-níl-yo; Spanish origin; dw Span. molinillo) [n.] hot chocolate stirrer, whisk, or beater. (see batirol) (a.k.a. batidor in Tagalog; batirol in Visayan)
mollo (mól-yo; Ilocano dish) [n.] (see under dinugoan)
molmol (mól-moli; Visayan fish) [n.] parrot fish. A species of sea fish with a beak at the tip of its mouth that looks similar to that of a parrot bird. The body is covered with big scales, and has brightly multi-colored skin that differs from each fish. Its white flesh is tasty when grilled or cooked in some soupy dish. Considered as one of the favorite fish served in Asian dining. In Leyte, this is the preferred kind of fish used in making tinabal (brined fish). (see also isda for the list of other fishes) (loro or isdang loro in Tagalog)
molo (mo-lo; Ilonggo) [n.] dumplings made of ground chicken and shrimp meats, starch and flavored with finely ground spices, a lump of this mixture is formed into a small ball and wrapped in thick pasta wrapper then steamed. The finished product looks like a filled pouch.
molo wrapper (mo-lo rá-per; Ilonggo) [n.] the wrapper used in dumplings and wontons. It is a thick sheet of flour dough often cut in squares or circles.
monamon bagoong (mo-na-mong ba-go-óng; Ilocano condiment) [n.] Ilocano anchovy paste, a fermented fish paste made from anchovies (dilis), to be served as a dip for different seafood dishes and other viands. It is available year-round and normally used to savor the Ilocano side dish called KBL (kamatis, bagoong, and lazona), and as essential ingredient in Ilocano vegetable dishes such as pinakbet, dinengdeng, or inabraw
monay (mó-nay; Tagalog bread) [n.] (see under tinapay)
monggo (móng-go; Tagalog, Hiligaynon (Ilonggo) & Waray beans) [n.] green gram bean \mungbean \chick pea \mongo (Phil.English) (also spelled as munggo; monggos in Cebuano & Cebuano)
*monggong pula (móng-gong pu-lá) [n.] red mung beans (monggos nga pula in Visayan)
*monggo-langka (móng-go láng-kà; Antique dish) [n.] boiled mungbeans with coconut milk and strips of jackftuit (unripe). Strips of rent dried fish or sautéed meat can be added as sahog to enhance the dish.
*monggo con hielo (móng-go kon yé-lo) [n.] red mung beans with sugar, milk and topped with lots of shaved ice. The beans are first soften by boiling it well.
*monggo guisado (móng-go gi-sá-do) [n.] mung beans sautéed in garlic, onions and tomatoes. Then boiled with flaked tinapang isda (smoked fish) or hibe (dried shrimps). Sliced ampalaya (bitter gourd) and malunggay (moringa) leaves can also be added. In Visayas, it is traditionally served during tapos (the last or 40th day of praying for their dead), or during Good Friday of the Lenten Season in some places in southern Luzon. (also spelled as munggo gisado; a.k.a. guisadong monggo or ginisang monggo)
*munggo gisado (móng-go gi-sá-do) [n.] (same as monggo guisado)
*guisadong monggo (gi-sá-dong móng-go) [n.] (same as monggo guisado)
*ginisang monggo (gi-ni-sàng móng-go) [n.] (same as monggo guisado)
*mung bean = (n.) (sc.name: Vigna radiata) a kind of bean under the pea family that is grown once a year to fertilize the soil (green manure) and for forage, and as a source of tiny beans and bean sprouts
monggos (móng-gos; Cebuano beans) [n.] (same as monggo)
*monggos nga pula (móng-gos nga pu-lá) [n.] red mung beans (monggong pula in Tagalog)
mongpong (móng-pong; Cebuano fish) [n.] anchovy fry \silver fish; A very tiny translucent anchovy, a kind of fish that is commonly eaten as kinilaw, or mixed with beaten chicken egg, pounded  peppercorn, and dash of salt then pan-fried into a patty or fish omelette called tortang mongpong or tortang dulong in Tagalog, If still very fresh, it can be fermented in salt to become ginamos. If cooked as paksiw (boiled in vinegar) it is wrapped in banana leaves folded into rectangular packets and boiled in vinegar with spices and seasoned with salt, it is cooked until dry \anchovy fry (dolong or dulong in Tagalog)
mono (mó-no) [n.] a refreshment made from caramelo (caramel candy) mixed and melted in lots of crushed ice.
morcilla (mor-síl-ya; Spanish origin) [n.] blood sausage. The ingredients used in making this sausage are curdled blood and liver of pig, finely chopped and minced with spices and seasoning, then stuffed in a tubular casing. The casing is originally and traditionally made of cleaned skin of pig’s intestines. Morcilla sausage is often used as one of the ingredients in making pochero (boiled meats and vegetables) or cocido (meat and vegetables boiled in broth).
morcon (mor-kón; Pampangueño dish; dw Span. morcon) [n.] beef rolls sausage \stuffed beef roulade. This large homemade sausage is made from thin sheets of sliced round beef or lean beef that are rolled to wrap the strips of carrots, sticks of pickles, a layer of ham, slices of boiled eggs, and layer or sticks of cheese. It could also be that all the mentioned fillings are minched then combined with ground lean beef or lean pork and added with some raisins. The roll is secured by tying a string around on both ends and in the middle, then it is simmered in tomato sauce until tender.
morkon (mor-kón) [n.] (same as morcon) (also spelled as morcon in Pampanga)
morisqueta tostada (mo-ris-ké-ta tos-tá-da; Spanish origin) [n.] Spanish fried rice.
moron (mo-rón; Waray (eastern Visayas) delicacy) [n.] see under suman (a.k.a. suman minuron)
motit (mo-tìt; Ilocano animal) [n.] civet cat (sc.name: Paradoxurus philippinensis) (same as the Tagalog alamid)
motse (mót-tse) [n.] (same as muchi)
mulamula (mu-la mú-la; Visayan fish) [n.] sunfish, a kind of fish (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
munamon (mu-ná-mon; Ilocano fish) [n.] tiny anchovy, conventionally made into bagoong by the Ilocanos (see also isda for the list of other fishes)
munggo (múng-go; Tagalog beans) [n.] (same as monggo)
munggo guisado (múng-go gi-sá-do) [n.] (same as monggo guisado; see under monggo)
muron (mu-ron) [n.] rolled steamed rice with chocolate filling and topped with coco jam.
muro-muro (mu-ro mú-ro; Compostela Valley and Davao provinces fish) [n.] round scad or hard-tail mackerel (see also Tagalog galunggong) (galunggong in Tagalog; hawol-hawol in Cebuano)
musang (mu-sang; So. Luzon animal) [n.] civet cat (sc.name: Paradoxurus philippinensis). Same as alamid. (see the Tagalog alamid).
muscovado (mus-ko-bá-do) [n.] (see under asukal)
mustasa (mus-tá-sâ; Tagalog and Cebuano vegetable) [n.] mustard cabbage \mustard (sc.name: Brassica integrifolia) (see also gulay for other Tagalog vegetables, and utanon for other Cebuano vegetables)
*dahon ng mustasa; mustasa dahon [n.] mustard leaf
muchi (mút-tsi) [n.] balls of galapong (rice dough) filled with mashed monggo (mung beans). The beans is cooked in coconut milk and sweetened with sugar, mashed then stuffed into the rice dough balls. The filled rice dough balls are steamed till the dough becomes fluffy. (also spelled as motse)
n
nabasa (na-ba-sâ; Ilocano) [adj.] not dry \wet (basa in Tagalog, Cebuano, Boholano & Hiligaynon; dumog in Bicolano; hulos or mahulos in Waray; in Ilocano; iwasan in Maguindanao)
nabasa (na-ba-sâ; Tagalog & Cebuano) [adj.] got wet (nahulos in Waray)
nahulos (na-hu-lós; Waray) [adj.] got wet (nabasa in Tagalog and Cebuano)
namit (na-mìt; Ilonggo term) [adj.] delicious \taste good \delectable (lami in Cebuano and Boholano, marasa or karasa in Waray; masarap in Tagalog; masiram or manamit in Bicolano)
nangka (náng-ka; Cebuano fruit) [n.] jackfruit (sc.name: Artocarpus heterophyllus) (see also langka) (langka in Tagalog, Ilonggo, Bicolano, and Waray; badak or nangka in Maranao)
napudot (na-pu-dot; Ilocano) [adj.] hot \warm (mainit or init in Tagalog, Cebuano; paso or mapaso in Waray; mapali in Pampangueño (Capampangan); ampetang in Pangasinense; mayao in Maranao; mayaw in Maguindanaoan; mala in Subanon)
nasamit (na-sa-mìt; Ilocano taste) [adj.] sweet \luscious (matamis in Tagalog; tam-is or matam-is in Cebuano; matam-is in Waray and Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); maamis in Bicolano; mayumu in Pampangueño (Capampangan) & Pangasinense; mamis in Maranao & Maguindanaoan; memis in Ibanag & Yakan)
nasarangsang (na-sa-rang-sáng; Ilocano) [adj.] crisp \crunchy (a.k.a. malutong in Tagalog and Pampangueño (Capampangan); kagumkom in Cebuano; tagumkom in Boholano; mahagpok in Hiligaynon (Ilonggo); makarub-karub or maragumo in Waray; maragsik in Bicolano; masalangsang in Pangasinense; kega in Maranao; matitik in Maguindanaoan)
nata de coco (na-ta de kó-ko) [n.] coconut gel. A jelly-like and semitransparent white substance that is cultured to grow and propagate in coconut water using a starter. It is full grow when it becomes semi-solid and yet gelatinous. The coconut gel is then harvested, diced and boiled in sugar syrup to sweeten them. The sweetened coconut gels are used as additional ingredient in fruit salad, halo-halo (mélange of sweetened fruits, root crops, milk and crushed ice), and other refreshments and desserts.
nata de piña (na-ta de pín-ya) [n.] pineapple gel. A jelly-like, semitransparent, yellowish substance that is cultured to grow and propagate in the skin of ripe pineapple and sugar as starter. It is semi-solid when full grown. The pineapple gel is harvested, diced and boiled in sugar syrup to sweeten the cubed gels. The sweetened cubes are used as additional ingredient in fruit salad, halo-halo (mélange of sweetened fruits, root crops, milk and crushed ice), and other refreshments and desserts.
natilla (na-tíl-ya) [n.] a type of custard that is made of egg yolks, milk and sugar that are mixed well and used as fillings for cakes, pastries and desserts.
natuk (na-tùk) [n.] a combined ingredients of landang and brown or red sugar
nevera (ne-bé-ra; dw Span. nevera [icebox]) [n.] an old-fashioned icebox. An old-time metal box that serves as cooler that is enclosed in wooden casing. It is used to store food in ice before modern refrigerator became a household appliance. (also spelled as nievera or nibera)
ngal-ngal (ngal-ngal; Ilocano) [n.] the act of chewing the food \chew (nguya in Tagalog; usap in Cebuano & Boholano; samsam in Waray; nguta-nguta in Bicolano; ngat-ngat in Pangasinense; semepa in Maguindanaoan; kineket in Samal; langestan in Pampangueño (Capampangan))
ngasorangis (nga-so-rá-ngis; Ilocano shellfish) [n.] a small shellfish
ngat-ngat (ngat-ngat; Pangasinense) [n.] the act of chewing the food \chew (nguya in Tagalog; usap in Cebuano & Boholano; samsam in Waray; ngal-ngal in Ilocano; nguta-nguta in Bicolano; semepa in Maguindanaoan; kineket in Samal; langestan in Pampangueño (Capampangan))
ngohiong (ngo-yong  , Cebuano delicacy) [n.] coconut pith roll (see more under lumpia)

ngo-yong powder (ngo-yong powder; Chinese origin) [n.] Chinese five-spice powder. A slightly pungent and aromatic combination of five ground spices: star anise, fennel seeds, cinnamon, Szechwan peppercorn, and fennel seeds. It is used to flavor meat dishes.
nguya (ngu-yà; Tagalog) [n.] the act of chewing the food \chew (usap in Cebuano & Boholano; ngal-ngal in Ilocano; nguta-nguta in Bicolano; samsam in Waray; ngat-ngat in Pangasinense; semepa in Maguindanaoan; kineket in Samal; langestan in Pampangueño (Capampangan))
nguta-nguta (ngal-ngal; Bicolano) [n.] the act of chewing the food \chew (nguya in Tagalog; usap in Cebuano & Boholano; samsam in Waray; ngal-ngal in Ilocano; ngat-ngat in Pangasinense; semepa in Maguindanaoan; kineket in Samal; langestan in Pampangueño (Capampangan))
nibera (ni-bé-ra; dw Span. nevera [icebox]) [n.] (same as nevera)
nido soup (ní-do sop; Chinese influence) [n.] (same as bird’s nest soup)
nievera (nye-bé-ra; dw Span. nevera [icebox]) [n.] (same as nevera)
nilaga (ni-lá-gâ; Tagalog dish) [n.] well stewed meat Leafy vegetables and peeled potatoes can be added as complementing ingredients. This dish can also be enhanced by adding herbs and spices when stewing is almost complete. It also refers to boiled meat, fish, and poultry (nilat-an in Cebuano)
*nilagang baka (Tagalog dish) [n.]beef stew, its beef cutlets boiled long and relished with some leafy vegetables, salt and spices.
*nilagang isda (Tagalog dish) [n.] boiled fish
*nilagang kamote (Tagalog dish) [n.] boiled sweet potato
*nilagang saging (Tagalog dish) [n.] boiled banana
*nilagang itlog (Tagalog) [n.] boiled egg (a.k.a. itlog na nilaga in Tagalog; nilapwaang itlog in Cebuano)
nilamaw (ni-la-máw; Visayan refreshment) [n.] fruit salad in fruit juice (see linamaw)
nilaneg (ni-la-nég; Ivatan dish) [n.] vegetables, fish and liver boiled with bagoong (fihpaste). Assortment of vegetables, such as kalabasa (squash), talong (eggplant), and sitaw (string beans) are sliced then boiled with the sahog of fish and sliced liver.
nilapet (ni-la-pét; Ilocano delicacy) [n.] (see under suman)
nilapwaan itlog (ni-lap-wa-ang ít-log; Cebuano cooked egg) [n.] boiled egg (a.k.a. nilagang itlog or itlog nilaga in Tagalog)
nilarang (ni-lá-rang; Cebuano dish) 1. [n.] fish or meat stewed well in coconut milk and spices and nothing else, except with some salt to taste; 2. [n.] reheated pork adobo, humba, lechon baboy (roasted pork) or any dish made of fatty meat. The dish is reheated well to the point that much of the fats are extracted or removed from the meat; 3. [adj.] cooked or stewed well in coconut milk and spices
nilasing na hipon (ni-la-síng na hí-pon; Tagalog dish) [n.] live shrimps soaked in wine or beer before being cooked in broth. The liquor causes intoxication to shrimps making their flesh soft when cooked. Hence, called nilasing, from the Tagalog word lasing, meaning “drunk.” The liquor used could be gin, serbesa (beer), bino (wine), or any fruit wine, including the tuba (palm wine) and the different kinds of rice wines.
nilata (ni-la-tá; Visayan) [n.] canned goods \canned food; [adj.] canned \in can (delata in Tagalog)
*nilata nga sardinas [n.] canned sardines (see also sardinas)
nilatik (ni-la-tìk; Bicolano delicacy) [n.] flakes of deboned fish, boiled in coconut milk with chilies, either using the siling labuyo (bird’s eye chilies) for intense hotness, or the siling haba (finger chilies) for mild piquancy. The fish is cooked until it is mashed or broke into smaller pieces.
nilat-an (ni-lát-an; Visayan) [n.] well stewed dish (see also nilaga) (nilaga in Tagalog)
nilidgid (ni-líd-gid; Visayan delicacy) [n.] cassava roll, a sweet cassava stick wrapped and rolled in wilted banana leaf (see under suman) (a.k.a. lidgid or iraid in Waray and Cebuano; suman kamoteng-kahoy in Tagalog)
nilitson (ni-lit-son; Tagalog cooking term) [adj.] roasted (inasal in Cebuano & Ilonggo)
nilohoan (ni-lo-hó-an; Badjao dish) [n.] fish boiled in sulasi (basil leaf).
verbena
nilubyan (ni-lub-yan; Tarlaqueño delicacy) [adj.] (see under calamay)
nilun-ag (ni-lun-ag; Cebuano staple) [n.] cooked rice or corn meal (a.k.a. dinun-ag, kan-on, luto in Cebuano; dinun-ag in Boholano; sinaing or kanin in Tagalog; tinuon in Waray; maloto in Bicolano; See in kanin on how to cook rice)
*nilun-ag nga kamote (Cebuano) [n.] boiled sweet potato \cooked sweet potato (nilagang kamote in Tagalog)
*nilun-ag nga saging (Cebuano) [n.] boiled banana \cooked banana (nilagang saging in Tagalog)
*nilagang kamote (Tagalog) [n.] (same as nilun-ag nga kamote)
*nilagang saging (Tagalog) [n.] (same as nilun-ag nga saging)
nilupak (ni-lu-pák; Batangueño and Tagalog delicacy) [n.] pounded banana \mashed banana. Young and green banana fruit of saba (local plantain) banana is cooked, peeled, and its pulp is pounded using wooden pestle and mortar (the one used in pounding rice grains). When it got mashed by pounding, a grated meat of not-so-mature green coconut fruit is added and pounding would continue to mix well the banana and grated coconut. Then some sugar is added to enhance flavor and make the mashed banana appealing to the taste. After pounding and mixing well, the mashed banana pulp is molded into desired shapes, usually in flat circles or bars. A spread of margarine is sometimes brushed on top then sprinkled with grains of refined white or brown sugar. In olden times in some rural places in Batangas, nilupak is part of courtship ritual, the parents of the girl observed the girl`s suitor as he pounded the nilusak and then the parents tasted the result to find out if their daughter’s lover was a good provider. (nilusak in Visayan; luyang in Davaoeño)
nilusak (ni-lu-sák; Visayan delicacy) [n.] pounded banana \mashed banana. This is made of cooked and pounded banana fruit mixed with grated coconut and sugar (see also nilupak) (nilupak in Batangas and Tagalog region; luyang in Davaoeño)
niluto (ka-lú-tò; Cebuano) [n.] the recipe (a.k.a. potahe in Cebuano and Tagalog; kaluto in Bulaqueño)
nipa (ni-pâ; Tagalog, Cebuano, Boholano, Hiligaynon (Ilonggo), Waray) [n.] nipa palm (sc.name: Nypa fruticans), a species of Asiatic palm tree that grows in muddy shores or ponds, has large bunches of nutty fruit encased in hard shell and from the newly sprouting brunch a sweetish sap is obtained and made into sukang Paombong. Its long palm leaves are harvested and thatched into a roof or wall material for the hut.
niyog (ni-yog; Tagalog) [n.] coconut (sc.name: Coco nucifera). This fruit of coconut tree is actually a seed, in fact the world’s largest seed and the source of coconut cream or coconut milk traditionally used as cream in cooking Filipino dishes (see gata), as well as the miraculous oil called virgin coconut oil (VCO). The coconut tree is considered as the “tree of life” for all parts of the plant have a plentiful properties and uses. The word coconut is derived from Caribbean word coco which means “head” and would mean “monkey face” for the New Guineans who believes that the palm tree spontaneously sprung from the head of the first man. Here, in the Philippines, it is not true that coconut as a cooking ingredient began and rests solely in the culinary hands of the Bicolanos. Bicol, which is the southern peninsula of mainland Luzon is only one of the 14 coconut producing regions in the entire archipelago. The fact is, coconut tree or plantation is can be seen from Babuyan Islands down to the remotest island in Jolo, Sulu. There are lots of coco dishes that are distinct in variation and style in any of the places in this country. In one of the studies conducted by the Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA), it was found out that coconut oil consumers have lower heart disease rates compared to non-coconut consumers because of the coconut’s mineral contents such as magnesium and potassium. A separate study by a former medical professor of the Univesity of the Philippines shows that people in coconut–consuming countries have lower cholesterol level and low incidence of having heart disease (lubi in Visayan and Mindanawanon)
*buko (bú-ko; Tagalog nut) [n.] young coconut fruit, that is still green or yellowish green with tender meat and sweetish juice (butong in Cebuano; silot in Waray)
*dahon ng niyogi (da-hon nang ni-yóg; Tagalog) [n.] coconut palm \coco palm
*ubod ng niyog (ú-bod nang ni-yóg; Tagalog) [n.] coconut pith
*bunga ng niyog (bu-nga nang ni-yóg; Tagalog) [n.] coconut fruit \coco palm fruit
*pungango (pu-ngá-ngo; Tagalog) [n.] newly formed tiny fruit of coconut. (See also putot under the Cebuano lubi)
*laman ng niyog (la-mán nang ni-yóg; Tagalog) [n.] coconut meat
*kopra [kóp-ras; n.] copra
noche buena (nó-tse bu-we-na; dw Span. noche buena) [n.] food and drinks served past midnight, right after the Christmas eve mass.
nuez moscada (no-wes mos-ká-da; Spanish nut; dw Span. nuez moscada) [n.] nutmeg (sc.name: Myristica fragrans). It is the hard, aromatic seed of an East Indian tree of the nutmeg family. Its outer covering is scraped or grated and used as an aromatic mace. (hukhok or lubot og anayin Cebuano)
nukos (nú-kos; Visayan cephalopod sea mollusk) [n.] squid \Squid is one of the safest kind of aquatic animals to consume because it has a very low level of mercury content (pusit in Tagalog; nuos in Waray)
nuos (nú-os; Waray sea mollusk) [n.] squid (see also pusit) (pusit in Tagalog; nukos in Cebuano)
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okoy (ó-koy; Bulakeño delicacy) [adj.] pumpkin or squash fritters with shrimps. It’s crust is crunchy and the middle is soft, slightly sweet and tangy to taste, good if lightly dipped in vinegar right before having a bite of this dish.
okoy (ó-koy; Marikina delicacy) [adj.] lumpia in cassava fritters, may be topped or dipped in syrup or sauce
okra (ok-ra; Tagalog and Cebuano vegetable) [n.] okra (sc.name: Abelmoschus esculentus) (see also gulay for other Tagalog vegetables, and utanon for other Cebuano vegetables)
oled (o-lèd; Maranao larvae) [n.] larva \worm (uod in Tagalog; ulod in Cebuano; ud in Boholano; anunuhot in Bicolano; apihis in Hiligaynon (Ilonggo))
one day old chick (wan dé awld tsik; Metro Manila) [n.] (same as day-old chick) (Also spelled as 1-day old chick)
orak(o-rák; Maranao) [n.] egg (see also itlog)
oregano (o-re-ga-nó) [n.] The Philippine oregano (sc.name: Coleus aromaticus), is a kind of herb that has hairy, fleshy, and scaly leaves with mint-like aroma. It has been used as a kitchen ingredient, as its strongly flavored leaves make an excellent stuffing in roasted meat, or additional ingredient in grilled meat, fried vegetables, and other specialty dishes that need that distinct aromatic mint flavor such as in dinugoan, lechon or any other roasted meat. The oil extracted from the leaf could slow down the spoilage of food and thus, minimizing the risk of ingesting harmful microorganisms. Oregano leaves can also be used to produce wine, vinegar, or juice tea
or-ormot (or-or-mòt; Ilokano seaweed) [n.] fine dark green seaweed in Ilocos.
otap (o-tap; Visayan biscuit) [n.] (see under biskuwit).
oved (o-ved Ivatan dish) [n.] (same as uved)
oyster sauce (oys-ter sóws) [n.] a salty sauce made from ground, dried meat of oysters and salt, often used in Chinese influenced dishes.

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